Dance Fun

  • A Dancer's Guide to New Year's Resolutions

    By: Jordann Smith-Kingston, Curtain Call® Intern and Model

    1M-T4060As a college student majoring in dance, I not only spend a lot of time dancing, but also writing, talking, and thinking about dance. My improvements in dance determine my grades, and with constant new ideas, it can be difficult to stay focused on improving. I often easily forget the reason I love to dance. To gain direction and reset focus, I have found goal setting to be an effective solution. The start of a new year is the perfect time to reset the stage and rework the choreography. Here are my 10 resolutions of 2017:

    1. Dance Anytime, Anywhere!
    I often find the urge to do a grand jete or pirouette unbearable. Though, I always refrain, knowing the strange looks that will follow from bystanders. This year I hope to say, “so what?” to the onlookers and move freely, as I wish. I hope my joy for dance will remind me, life is a performance and I don’t need a barre or a class to justify dancing.

    2. Clean Out That Dance Bag
    My dance bag has everything from old homework and orange peels, to athletic tape and bobby pins. It is easy to quickly cram everything in and decide to deal with it later. But, later, is now. A clean dance bag, is a clear mind… which will help me easily find the things I do need, (like the left shoe that always disappears just before class). Keeping the stinky dance shoe smell away is important, too. I recommend after-use spray for shoes, scent balls made for athletic gear, or small bags of lavender.

    3. Ice, Ice Baby
    Icing can help with treating an injury, coping with an ongoing pain, or even preventing a future injury. For many dancers, including myself, this is often ignored advice. The constant strain our bodies endure from dance and other activities increases our risk of overused joints and shin splints. Icing more frequently will help me approach every class and rehearsal more fully charged.

    4. Eat Healthy
    Our diets play a large role in our attitude, energy levels, skin, digestive patterns, and so much more. For dancers, it’s difficult to balance a healthy diet with rigorous rehearsal schedules. To focus on a well-balanced diet, I have decided to implement a few little tricks. Packing light, energy loaded snacks of almonds, berries, or rice cakes with peanut butter, for long days of rehearsal. Precooking my meals, rather than buying on-the-go, to control portions and regulate healthy ingredients. Controlling indulgences, rather than letting the indulgences control me. And lastly, listening to my body and not overeating.

    5. Cross Train for Cardio
    Stamina is my weakest point of dance. To improve this, work must be done outside of the studio to concentrate on strengthening the heart. For dancers, the most beneficial activities are low-impact: swimming, elliptical, hot-yoga, cycling, or Pilates are some excellent examples. These exercises will also build muscle in areas not always utilized through dance.

    6. Get Back to the Basics
    Continuing to take beginner level classes helps to concentrate on basic technique. It is the perfect opportunity to remove the complexity of phrases or movements, and focus on small details, like muscle initiation or positioning. After all, life is about enjoying the little things, like nailing a triple pirouette en pointe for the first time!

    7. Wear Supportive Gear
    Although it’s easy to throw on a pair of flip-flops in the summer, they provide minimal support. Make conscious decisions when choosing proper footwear. Choose something that protects your feet, while supporting your arch and helping you to maintain proper posture and weight-distribution.

    8. See More Professional Dance
    Living in D.C., there are always popular groups or individuals coming to perform. Immersing yourself in professional performances allows you to see things differently or learn something new. Supporting other artists helps to find fresh inspiration and is also a great way to network with other dancers!

    9. Rehearse Before Rehearsal
    Rehearsal is intended for learning new choreography and reworking to perfect technique. It is not, however, time for reviewing old material. By rehearsing before, more time can be spent cleaning and the choreographer will view you as a well-prepared, professional student.

    10. Dance for ME!
    Every dancer has reasons for staying up late and spending hours in rehearsals and class or enduring large amounts of pain. Whatever the reason is, it always boils down to a love of dance. This year, I plan to keep that focus in mind as a mantra. I refuse to dance in order to make someone else approve or to try to dance like someone else or to try to change myself. I will dance because it has been and always will be my first love. It is the one constant in my life and brings me an inexplicable resounding joy that I want to share. Dancing defines me!

  • Inspiring Confidence Through Costumes Part Three: 2016 Trends & 2017 Predictions

    CandicePicQ&A with Candice Specht, Curtain Call Designer

    How long have you worked in costume design? How did you get into this field?

    I have worked in the dance costume design industry for about seven years and three and a half years at Perform Group. I began college as a fashion design major, but I quickly learned that I wasn’t interested in doing mass-marketed fashion lines. Instead, I decided to fuse my two passions together. I began dancing when I was two or three years old and while in high school, I began teaching like my mom. I loved dancewear because it was a niche area.

    What inspires you?

    Lots of shopping! I look at today’s fashion trends and play with how I can incorporate those into dancewear specifically. I look at Vogue and Seventeen magazines to see what’s inspiring the fashion of today’s younger women. Celebrity styles in tabloids, big fashion runway shows and retail websites like Rent the Runway are other ways that allow me to visualize what people would look like in dance costumes that are trendy.

    Movies are pop culture inspirations. I anticipate that The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast will be the most recreated styles in 2017. Marvel and heroine movies and music will continue to gain popularity and momentum through next year.

    Music is another impactful inspiration because I imagine the movements to that song and what style would complement that music. What musicians like Ariana Grande, Katy Perry and Beyoncé are wearing in music videos and the red carpet set the tone for dance costume fashion.

    What does your day look like as a dance costume designer?

    My first task when I get in the office is answering emails. Then I explore costs and materials for our garments. Next on my to-do list is seeking inspiration. That ranges from magazines and tabloids, to Google and Pinterest searches, to online shopping.

    When I’m developing an outfit, I will draw a very rough sketch on paper with a list of items I want to incorporate within the margins. After this initial sketch, I continue more detailed work on Adobe Illustrator.

    I work on a team with three in-house designers and one freelance designer. Though we each have our own offices, we have a large open space where we collaborate.

    What is your favorite genre of dance to design for?

    My favorite genre of dance to design for has to be contemporary because it’s fun to incorporate current fashion trends and dress details like the latest wedding dress styles. My favorite age group to design for is the tween and teen dancers.

    What are the most popular colors and fabrics to incorporate into your designs?

    Green is my favorite color so I was happy to hear “greenery” was Pantone’s color of the year, especially since it’s not normally that popular of a color to incorporate into dance costumes. Black, blush and beige tones are staple colors that have been popular for years.

    The 1990s style is back in fashion and we see that carrying into dance. We’ve also seen a ton of demand for off the shoulder and slit sleeves over the past year.

    Sparkles and sequins are always popular. Velvet comes in and out of style. Pleated fabrics are really in right now. My favorite item to design is intricate backs.

    What was your favorite design this year?

    The ballet costume Blushing Bouquet (C354) was my favorite Curtain Call design of the year. It’s all about the fabric in that style.

    Candice_Style

  • Giving Thanks to Your Biggest Fans

    flowersEach year on the fourth Thursday of November, many Americans take time to reflect on what they are grateful for. As a studio owner, it’s easy to get caught up as you juggle running your business with the holiday season, but it’s important to thank those who continue to make your studio a success all year long. Doing so shows you care for and respect your customers, which can help strengthen your relationships. Here are eight ways to thank your studio parents and dancers:

    1. Make parents feel welcomed and comfortable. If your studio space allows for it, set up a coffee or magazine station for parents to enjoy while waiting for their dancers. By making your customers feel comfortable and offering small tokens of gratitude, you show you are thinking about the long hours a dance parent may have.
    2. When students or families volunteer in support of studio initiatives or events, take time to write hand-written notes to show your gratitude. A bouquet of flowers for dancers that meet a goal or for parents that go above-and-beyond volunteering to make the studio’s recital or community event a success can also be a nice gesture.
    3. Host a Parent Participation or Observation Day, in which parents of students can experience first-hand or observe a variety of dance styles and classes. Not only will parents have fun and learn more about dance, they will leave with a deeper understanding of your studio.
    4. Thank senior students by allowing them to lead a class. It’s a fun way for students to flex their skills and take initiative with something they love to do.
    5. Organize a student and parent group outing by obtaining group tickets to a local play, musical, ballet or symphony. This allows your studio community to spend time together and enjoy the arts at a discounted price.
    6. Give a discount on classes, costumes or classwear to dancers who register for a certain number of classes or to those who refer others to your studio. Additionally, consider setting up a milestone program to recognize students that have been with your studio for five or more years. Giving out certificates or small gifts (such as framed photos, dance gear, pins or jewelry), can be a sincere and personalized way to show students you appreciate their loyalty and want them to stay and grow with your studio family.
    7. When parents put in extra hours to support studio events, organize a raffle featuring local businesses including spa days, restaurant gift certificates, or parent studio gear for them to wear to competitions. These special gifts show you recognize the work and impact volunteers are making.
    8. For students, host cast parties to help them celebrate and show that you’re thankful for the hard work that they have put in. This gives students the fun time they deserve after all of their dedication and effort.

    Whether it’s a special event or gift, or simply kind words, it’s important to share thanks with your students and their families. Whichever way you choose to show your gratitude, make it personal to continue to deepen your student and parent relationships.

  • Life Without Dance: There’s No Such Thing

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    By: Christine Luca

    Every dancer knows that there is a lot of truth in the saying “once a dancer, always a dancer.” The urge to move to the newest beat or tap dance down grocery store aisles is something that will never go away. But with many dancers concluding their formal dance training after high school or college, the transition from routine training to recreational dancing is often interrupted by other priorities. As schedules fill up, it can seem like there is never enough time in the day, but it’s important to make time for dance—it’s good for the mind, body and soul. Here are some ways to keep dance a part of your life:

     

    Consider dance a social activity: Sharing experiences and meeting others with the same passion for dance is a fun way to keep dance in your life. To do this, consider volunteering, joining interest groups or teaching.

    • Be a volunteer: Volunteering at dance schools or theaters is a great way to meet new people while absorbing dance culture and giving back. Nonprofit dance companies and community theaters are often looking for volunteers to help with tickets, lighting and backstage duties during performances and rehearsals. These opportunities allow you to meet and socialize with people in your area who have similar interests.

     

    • Join a social group: To help you find your social niche in school, consider joining dance-related interest groups. After high school, dancers should consider joining collegiate dance clubs. Many of these groups will even host end-of-year showcases that allow you maintain your performance skills. After college, dancers should explore young adult classes at community centers like the YMCA. When Dancing with the Stars first aired, studios began to offer more organized classes for adult ballroom dancing, touting health benefits of dance for people of all ages. For a more casual social dance setting, there may be opportunities in your area like country line dancing, which is a little different than the typical dance class, but just as fun!

     

    • Start teaching: Teaching classes is a very typical way to transition off of an intensive training schedule, still enjoy the benefits of dance and connect with dance-lovers along the way. Trained dancers can become teacher’s assistants early on in their dance career to prepare them for a teaching role in the future. There are also many dance conventions and seminars that take place across the country to stay up to date with the newest trends in the dance community.

     

    Participate in fitness classes: Signing up for Barre and Zumba classes is one of the easiest ways to keep dance in your life, while staying in shape and focusing on personal wellness. With new studios, such as 305 Fitness and TAPfit, opening on a regular basis, you’ll never get bored and can always find one that offers your favorite style. Cardio tap is my new favorite!

    Another exercise option that is popular among dancers is yoga. The focus on balance and extension are vital skills for dancing, but also great for toning and stress relief.

     

    Enjoy the arts: Every art form gives participants the ability to express themselves through a wide range of emotions.  Former dancers can tap into their creative side by taking part in other art forms.

    • Explore fine arts: Former dancers looking to maintain a creative, expressive outlet can turn to a number of activities in the fine arts. For example, paint and pottery classes are fun social activities that allow you to channel your artistic impulses in a group setting, similar to dance classes.

     

    • Go to the theatre: Theatre is another collaborative form of art that uses the body to convey emotion, similarly to dance. Added bonus if you go to a musical—there’s guaranteed to be some great dancing!

     

    Support other dancers: This may seem like an obvious one, but I encourage all dancers to get out there and watch dance performances. Watching other dancers is inspiring and fun, and can remind you why you fell in love with the art in the first place.

    • Turn on the television: Watching televisions shows, such as So You Think You Can Dance and Dancing with the Stars, allows you to be the expert judge from your living room. It keeps you involved with the dancing community and can provide inspiration and entertainment.

     

    • Attend live events: Going to live events in the community put on by local schools and dance companies is a lot of fun and often free. Start following your local dance and theatre groups on social media to see what’s coming up on their events calendar.

     

    Concluding routine training may be a challenging transition, but dance does not need to completely leave your life. There are countless ways to keep your dancing spirit alive and connect with other dance-lovers. Once a dancer, always a dancer!

  • 5 Reasons You Need to Leap Over to Your Closest Costume Preview Show!

    By Ashley Zimmerman, National Dance Sales Manager

    Each year, our relationship managers hit the road to meet with studio owners across the country at our highly-anticipated costume preview shows. At the shows, you can view Curtain Call’s latest styles so you can start planning your season’s performances and find the costumes that will inspire you to make your dreams a reality!

    Stop by and visit us at one of this year’s seven full-line shows, or 28 preview shows. Each costume preview show is an opportunity to mingle with other dance professionals, meet your Relationship Manager, enter to win prizes and have some fun. But if that isn’t enough to convince you to join us, here are some highlights from last year’s shows.

    1. Eliminate costly travel expenses - we come to your area! With our Costume Preview Shows strategically located throughout the U.S., we make it more convenient for you! Come alone or bring your whole team for a costume planning event!
      Our 2015 East Coast Premiere Party had quite the layout! Our 2015 East Coast Premiere Party had quite the layout!
    2. Get to know your RM better—they’re fun, we promise! Our relationship managers are just like you – they have extensive dance knowledge, whether as dancers, teachers, or studio owners, so they know what you need to help you through your busy dance season. They’re there for you every step of your journey. Come put a face to a name!
      Everyone enjoyed the 2015 West Coast Premiere Party at the Hyatt Regency Orange County with our RM, Takisha! Everyone enjoyed the 2015 West Coast Premiere Party at the Hyatt Regency Orange County with our RM, Takisha!
    3. Check out the latest styles—it’s way better than browsing online! Our models are actual dancers, making it easy to see how costumes will fit and look on your own students. Additionally, we work hard to ensure that your browsing experience is fun and personalized—you are our VIP!
      Our beautiful models were ready for our Costume Preview Show in Orlando, FL! Our beautiful models were ready for our Costume Preview Show in Orlando, FL!
    4. Mix and mingle with fellow dancers and dance lovers—you may even meet a celebrity or two. With special guests and speakers from all over the country, you can gather the insights you need to help run your business, while gaining inspiration from those who know the industry best.
    5. Enter to win great prizes and receive a $100 merchandise credit, just for attending! We’re excited to show you our new line and want to thank you for coming to our costume preview show by giving you some money towards your next purchase.

    This year we’re excited for even more speakers and fun! Special guests include:

    Steve Sirico & Angela D'Valda Sirico of Dance Teacher Web, MusicWorksDanceTeacherWeb-logo

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    Misty Lown of More Than Just Great Dancing
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    Save the date for an event near you by checking out our full line-up of events here.

  • Top 10 Things All Choreographers Know to Be True

    08232016-ChoreographersChoreography is a form of creativity that has the power to connect dancers physically, intellectually and emotionally. With each piece you develop, you’re creating a story; weaving together not only movements, but ideas and feelings, that dancers and audience members alike can relate to. Even after a long day and aching blisters, there’s nothing else in the world choreographers would rather do.

    Here are ten things that only choreographers will understand:

    1. Creativity can spark at any moment. Whether you’re listening to music on your morning commute or shopping for a new outfit or costume -- you find inspiration everywhere. A new beat or design can get choreography started in your head.
    2. Every new song on the radio is judged on a scale from impossible to easily choreograph-able. You know all the top hits before they are hits.
    3. Your self-evaluation of the choreography makes a mirror your best friend and worst enemy.
    4. Your choreography outfit style changes based on your mood. Sometimes it’s hair down, shoes and harem pants, other times it is shorts and bare feet.
    5. No matter how many times you review your notes, when it comes time to teach a routine, you won’t be able to read your handwriting.
    6. By the end of you teaching this newly choreographed piece, number counts turn into noises. Cue the boom, chas, uh-ohs, etc.
    7. You live your emotions through dance and every choreographed piece represents a part of your life.
    8. YouTube is your favorite social channel. Hours of inspiration right at your fingertips.
    9. You find yourself judging choreography in every dance movie, show and concert, and how your spin could make it better.
    10. Seeing your choreography come to life is the one of the most gratifying feelings you can experience.
  • Curtain Call 2017 Collection: Inspiring Dreams

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    Dear Valued Customer,

    For 47 years, our customers have supported our efforts to grow and make a difference in the dance costume market. I have been blessed to have had the opportunity to provide the leadership and serve you, our customers, since the very beginning. It has been, and continues to be, an exciting and rewarding ride to evolve and advance our business alongside yours.

    Last year, we worked hard to inspire your creativity as choreographers and studio owners. This year, we are attempting to help make your creative visions reality by offering even more magical styling. So, thanks to your input, we are proud to present to you our 2017 collection: “Inspiring Dreams.”

    As Walt Disney once said, “If you can dream it, you can do it.” We know both you and your dancers have big dreams, and with a variety of designs that can complement any choreography and all dancers, those dreams can come to fruition. Whether you’re aspiring to choreograph a great performance, nurture the next prima ballerina or discover a hip-hop superstar, we want you to focus on achieving those dreams. Meanwhile, we’ll we take care of the rest.

    To do this, we promise to continue the same best-in-market customer service that you’ve counted on in the past. We will ship on time, provide budget-friendly options while consistently delivering the highest quality products in the industry. We understand every season comes with new challenges and obstacles, but our goal is to ease your path to the finish line. We want to help fuel your imagination while adding no additional stress, so you can instead focus your energy on creating and enjoying magical moments on the way to achieving your dreams.

    In short, we believe in your aspirations, and we’re thankful, proud and honored to be your partner on this journey towards bringing your dreams to life.

    Our very best wishes for a fabulous year,

    Tighe King, CEO, Perform Group and the Curtain Call team

    Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

  • The Relationship Managers Tell All: Favorite Choreography

    RM-Fave-Choreography-CollageLive and taped performances alike have a way of touching us as people and artists. Whether it’s the breathtaking passion of the dancers, the catchy beat of the music or the flawless costumes, these well-choreographed routines are unforgettable to us and often serve as inspiration. Some of our Relationship Managers took on the challenge of identifying their most favorite pieces of choreography. Did anyone name your favorite, or can you think of one that should’ve made the list? Let us know in the comments!

    Christine RMChristine Luca – Relationship Manager for New England

    My favorite famous piece of choreography is Danny Kaye and Vera Ellen performing “The best things happen when you're dancing” from White Christmas. Always puts a smile on my face!

     

     

    Ashley Sales ManagerAshley Zimmerman – National Dance Sales Manager

    My favorite is George Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes, which has been brought to life by numerous companies, including the New York City Ballet and the Washington Ballet.

     

     

    Amelia RMAmelia Smith-Fazio – Relationship Manager for Georgia and Florida

    There are too many to choose from! For ballet, Rudolph Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn in the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet is a well-choreographed classic, but I also love the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre’s Sinner Man.

     

     

    Liz RMElizabeth Barton - Relationship Manager for Greater Philadelphia, New Jersey, Delaware and the Eastern Shore

    As an audience member of Brittany Spears’s Dream Within a Dream Tour, I couldn’t believe how awesome her dancers were. The tour was directed and choreographed by Wade Robson and Brook Lipton was one of her back up dancers at the time.

     

     

    Stacey RM Stacey Raab - Relationship Manager for Pennsylvania & Maryland

    My ballet go-tos have to be Act 3 Kitri Variation from Don Quixote and Little Swan from Swan Lake choreography by Nureyev; but I do love Martha Graham Company’s Errand into the Maze in the modern choreography realm.

  • Dancing Across Generations

    Old-School-TVSome things never go out of style: table manners, denim, birthday parties, little black dresses…..and dance! You may have noticed that recently, television and movie producers have been uniting generations by remaking classic, popular dance movies. Today’s top stars have joined these casts and crews, making these revivals relevant and exciting to younger audiences, while still giving more mature viewers a healthy dose of nostalgia. Summer provides some extra downtime to revisit these dance-centric films that have withstood the test of time:

    • Grease is the word: In January, FOX coordinated “Grease: LIVE”, a live television broadcast of the classic movie-musical that featured stars including Julianne Hough, Vanessa Hudgens and Mario Lopez. The 1978 American musical romantic comedy film was reimagined, but the style stayed largely the same. The bright red lipstick and black leather outfits wow-ed audiences of all ages and the letterman jackets stayed exactly as we remembered them. If you weren’t able to catch the live broadcast, check it out on Netflix!
    • No one puts baby in the corner: ABC is working on a three-hour musical version of the 1987 hit “Dirty Dancing,” the much-loved story of how good girl Frances ‘Baby’ Houseman falls for – and learns some serious dance moves from! --Johnny Castle, the dance instructor at her family’s Catskills summer resort. The host station of “Dancing with the Stars” will recreate the movie’s iconic dance lift that made everyone trust their dance partner. The cast includes Debra Messing, Nicole Scherzinger and Abigail Breslin.
    • Whatever you feel, just dance it: Lifetime is creating a sequel to the beloved 2000s classic “Center Stage.” This time around, the American Ballet Academy is tasked with incorporating more contemporary styles into its ballet repertoire, and Peter Gallagher will return as the stern director everyone loves to hate. The sequel will include “Dance Moms” alum Chloe Lukasiak, who stars as a young ballerina vying for a spot in the company. These cast choices will make new and old viewers excited to watch just how modern the classic art of ballet can get.
    • Kick off your Sunday shoes: Catch “Footloose,” the 1984 American musical drama turned 2011 contemporary movie, proving any generation can appreciate a good rebel. Julianne Hough and Kenny Wormald take on this small town with a big city attitude.

    With your downtime this summer, consider reconnecting with old and new timeless favorites that remind us dance is a universal language that stretches across generations. Who knows, you just might get inspired to whip out some classic dance moves or choreograph to a retro song!

  • Summer Blues? Put on Your Dancing Shoes!

    By: Stacey Raab, Relationship Manager

    Summer-SunFrom our team at Curtain Call to you: Congratulations on wrapping up what we hope was a successful and fulfilling recital season! You have certainly earned some time to relax, rejuvenate and reflect on your achievements—both big and small—from the past year.

    While the summer months provide an important opportunity to unwind and refocus, they also provide numerous excuses for your students to step away from dance for a few weeks. After competition and recital seasons, many dancers are in their best shape. Stopping cold turkey over the summer may cause them to lose the technique and physicality they worked so hard to achieve during the school year. Occasionally students will take the summer off from dancing then return in the fall to find that they’ve fallen behind compared to their peers who continued their practice year-round. This can lead to hurt feelings or unhappy dancers and parents.

    So while it’s easy to let the summer heat lure your students into a swimming pool or onto a couch in an air conditioned room, be sure to think about keeping them engaged over the summer to set them up for success come fall:

    Tips for Studio Owners

    Consider Adding New Classes. Summer is a great time to test drive classes and assess how popular they may be in the fall. Offering trendy classes like pop ballet, jazz-funk or improvisation may encourage existing students to consider classes outside of their comfort zones and even attract new students who are intrigued by your studio’s unique offerings. Also, organizing classes in disciplines like yoga, aerial yoga, gymnastics and Pilates give your more serious dancers an opportunity to cross-train and maintain the flexibility and strength that they built over the last season.

    Welcome Guest Teachers. To keep engagement and excitement levels high during the slower summer months, welcome guest teachers into your studio to teach a class or a series of classes. Guests can be anyone from studio alumni who are home for the summer to master dancers from out of town. You can even offer workshops to give some of your advanced dancers a chance to try their hand setting choreography on their peers.

    Offer Specialized Camps or Private Lessons. More often than not, parents—especially working parents—are looking for interesting ways to keep their children occupied during the week. To accommodate this desire, consider offering specialized camps that allow students to develop their technique across dance genres while spending time with their friends.

    Additionally, offering private lessons (or offering them at a discounted rate during the summer) is a great way to provide students with one-on-one instruction that they may not be getting during the school year. This personalized attention may help students feel more engaged with their practice and get them excited to excel in their regular classes come fall.

    Participate in Community Events. If your community celebrates summer with activities like festivals, parades and charity drives, get your students involved. Work with the event coordinators to secure a spot for your dancers to perform one of their recital pieces for attendees. Participation in these events gives your students an excuse to stay in shape and also doubles as a great marketing tactic to attract new dancers to your studio.

    Engage Students via Social Media. Consider incentivizing a social media contest that encourages your students to share dancing photos during their summer breaks. You may be surprised by the submissions you receive: arabesques on the beach during a family vacation or even lunch break pirouettes during a student’s first summer job!

    Summer days don’t have to be lazy! With the right combination of summer offerings, your students can stay engaged, flexible and active during their summer breaks, and you can ensure that your studio is set up for a successful season.

    What are your tricks for keeping students engaged during the summer? We want to know! Share in the comments below.

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